Author Topic: Med-kits  (Read 1138 times)

AndyC

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Med-kits
« on: July 26, 2016, 03:48:09 PM »
I like to keep a small medical kit in my vehicle's boot (ok, ok - trunk!) with supplies suitable for trauma such as a car-crash or even a gun-shot wound - no matter where I am, my vehicle is usually nearby and on the range I attach the pouch to my range-bag.

I hadn't repacked my kit in a few years so to this end I bought a new 5x7" pouch and fresh supplies including tourniquet, nasopharyngeal tube/lube, Ceelox and Quik-Clot blood-clotting gauze and powder, Israeli bandage, chest seals, etc, etc.



In a few weeks I'll be taking a tactical combat casualty medical course which is known to be stressful during the exercises but should be fun. Anybody else doing anything?

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Jarrod Matham

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2016, 04:01:24 PM »
That's pretty cool and ingenious!
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Badreligion1979

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2016, 04:35:08 PM »
My vehicles have fairly extensive med kits inside them as well as smaller booboo kits in the glove boxes. My day pack also has a full IFAK (individual first aid kit). When I go to the range or other activity that has an potential for increased injury to myself or others I bring along my large med kit. 

I am currently First Aid/CPR/AED qualified through the ARC. I have taken multiple formal first aid and combat life saver courses, individual training with EMTs, Paramedics and Advanced combat medics. I have been meaning to take a wilderness survival first aid course.

Start the Breathing
Stop the Bleeding
Protect the Wound
Treat for Shock

AndyC

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2016, 08:38:16 PM »
Very nice indeed :)

The Patriot Nurse runs medical courses - not specifically wilderness but SHTF type stuff: http://www.thepatriotnurse.com/pages/class-calendar
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sos24

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2016, 10:29:05 PM »
I have a few medical kits - home, car, BOB, and travel bag.  Usually I buy components and build my own. 

I thought about taking some classes, but haven't taken any in several years.  I do know some stuff from the various qualifications and annually refreshers I had to do while in the Navy.

Indigodog

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2016, 07:38:43 PM »
Sigh, I'll admit I have yet to put together a med kit that is more than a pack of bandaids. Looks like you have a good basic start in a pack you can grab when it is needed. I'm going to need a "how to" video or some direction on making a kit.
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Indigodog

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2016, 09:51:20 AM »
Looks like I have some reading to do... LOL thanks.
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BuddhaFett

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2016, 01:33:01 PM »
I like to keep a small medical kit in my vehicle's boot (ok, ok - trunk!) with supplies suitable for trauma such as a car-crash or even a gun-shot wound - no matter where I am, my vehicle is usually nearby and on the range I attach the pouch to my range-bag.

I hadn't repacked my kit in a few years so to this end I bought a new 5x7" pouch and fresh supplies including tourniquet, nasopharyngeal tube/lube, Ceelox and Quik-Clot blood-clotting gauze and powder, Israeli bandage, chest seals, etc, etc.

[IMG]http://i63.tinypic.com/2qla8ib.jpg[/l
In a few weeks I'll be taking a tactical combat casualty medical course which is known to be stressful during the exercises but should be fun. Anybody else doing anything?

Tourniquets are supposed to be wide to spread out pressure.  I would recommend doing more research into your choice of tourniquets.  The one you chose will be more likely to need limb removal than a standard because it's so thin.
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AndyC

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2016, 10:34:41 PM »
No.

It seems you might be mistaken in how it's designed to be applied but you're welcome to find me an example of when someone lost a limb due to the use of this tourniquet.

I also have no interest in getting into any kind of debate as to the pros and cons of my specific choices as 1. I've made them very carefully and 2. they're examples of the types of items one might think of adding to a kit. You're welcome to make your own choices.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 10:40:18 PM by AndyC »
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AndyC

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2016, 11:32:55 PM »
Here's most of what I have in mine - perhaps useful as a starting point for folks to get some ideas:

QuikClot 3.5" x 3.5" sponge: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HJTH0DA/
Face Shield Barrier Pocket Masks with 1 Way Valve, Box of 10: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AM4DLHS/
3M Steri-Strip reinforced Skin Closures - 1/2" x 4" - 60 strips: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004WFXCSQ/
Nasopharyngeal Airway: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003950R2E/
Vent Chest Seal, 2 Count: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KQS2NGK/
Israeli Bandage, 6": https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003DPVERM/
Ceelox blood-clotting crystals, 3-pack: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IP03838/
RATs tourniquet: https://www.amazon.com/T-S-Rapid-Application-Tourniquet-System/dp/B00OCX1D8Y/

Suturing kit (I wouldn't recommend this for most people but I have it in mine):
Mayo Hegar Needle Holder 5" Serrated: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EWXKCO0/
Suture Thread with Needle - Pkg. Of 5: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B014SRY5FG/
Operating Scissors Sharp/Blunt 5-1/2" Straight: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0008GCV76/
Adson Tissue Forceps: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0010VUQNY
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 11:35:26 PM by AndyC »
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BuddhaFett

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2016, 02:29:29 AM »
{https://cagmain.com/2015/05/24/cats-eat-rats-tourniquet-comparisons/}
This is a good explanation of why the RATS is not a good idea.
The TL;DR of it is that they really aren't CoTCCC approved and have never been proved to work.  I would much rather carry the extra bulk of a combat proven system.
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AndyC

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2016, 11:47:55 AM »
Well:

1. I'm a combat vet who's had to apply aid in the field and don't need your approval - let's get that clear up-front. No idea what your claim-to-fame is; don't much care, either.

2. RATs haven't sought CoTCCC approval as they don't sell to the military, so I'm not sure why you believe that's even relevant to anything - at all. Your link also admits they haven't even tested it themselves:
Quote
If we received one in the mail, we’d surely test it out further.

Ah - right. That would convince me...

3. Both the CAT and SOFT-T have dramatic levels of failure:

Quote
Pulse elimination was poor for CAT (25% failure) and SOFT-T (60% failure) even in classroom conditions following training. CAT was more quickly applied ( p < 0.005) and more effective ( p < 0.002) than SOFT-T. Training fostered fast and effective application of leg tourniquets while performance declined under simulated combat. The inherent efficacy of tourniquet products contributes to high failure rates under combat conditions, pointing to the need for superior tourniquets and for rigorous deployment preparation training in simulated combat scenarios.

Quote
A recent analysis of combat casualties indicated a 21% failure rate for the Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT), the most commonly used prehospital tourniquet, and a 34% failure rate for the Special Operation Forces Tactical Tourniquet (SOFT-T), which advertises, “Proven to be 100% effective during USAISR testing.” This is unacceptable, particularly given that 91% of potentially survivable battlefield deaths from 2001 to 2011 were due to hemorrhage.

Source: Effects of Training and Simulated Combat Stress on Leg Tourniquet Application Accuracy, Time, and Effectiveness -
LCDR Richard Schreckengaust, MC USN; CDR Lanny Littlejohn, MC USN; Gregory J. Zarow, PhD - MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 179, February 2014

Quote
2 CAT Tourniquets broke while being applied
• Ensure that, if you are carrying CAT tourniquets, they are new and have not been previously used for training or sitting on kit exposed
to the elements for an extended period of time. Approximately one tenth of tourniquets broke while being applied.

Source: Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care - Meeting Minutes
Davis Conference Center, MacDill AFB, FL - 4-5 February 2014

4. A few people like the RATs tourniquet - just nobodies like Special Ops guys and medical doctors including a cardiologist and a trauma surgeon from Harvard: 

http://ratstourniquet.com/medical-endorsements/



A trauma surgeon who worked on the Boston Marathon bombing victims and has replaced his personal tourniquets with the RATs - yeah, I think I'll go with that guy.

5. As I said before, carry whatever you like - nobody's stopping you - but you'll pardon me if I take the word of surgeons over some piddly little website which hasn't even tested the thing.

6. For what it's worth, I have a SOFT-T next to me right now as well, as you'll see below - sorry that you assumed anything.



7. I don't care what you'd prefer - what do you even have right now? Anything at all? Post a verifiable picture if you do.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2016, 12:51:35 PM by AndyC »
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HuckleberryFun

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2016, 02:35:10 PM »
Shown is my Orca IFAK attached to the Eberlestock G1 Little Brother pack that is my dual purpose NET/CERT pack (in Portland CERT is called NET for neighborhood emergency team...same thing) and bug out bag. The med-kit tears away from the velcro backed molle attachment when needed. I keep an additional tourniquet in a separate BOK (blow out kit) on my battle belt under the idea that they should be easily accessible by either hand in case one or the other is injured (or missing altogether)... but the battle belt is not something I'd go around wearing pre-WROL, unless its at a tactical training course or something.

In the pill bottle is aspirin, ibuprofen, ammonium, and some really good painkillers left over from when I broke my arm last year  :P

I was trained to use CAT-T tourniquets, but after reading the above informative posts, I'll be researching and re-evalutating that.


AndyC

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Re: Med-kits
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2016, 03:44:12 PM »
Very nice indeed  :)

I finished the TCCC course last weekend where we used the CAT and SOFT-T extensively. CoTCCC (Committee for TCCC) is aware of the breakages and the CAT Gen 7 (gray sharpie tab) is now out - the windlass is apparently a lot tougher, so I'll add one of those when I can find one.

Below I just used a CAT Gen 6 (white sharpie tab) on the actor's thigh:
There's nothing quite like the offer of 230 grains to a man's chest to remind him of his manners.