Author Topic: NRA 2017 voting ballot recommendations  (Read 96 times)

chibajoe

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NRA 2017 voting ballot recommendations
« on: March 22, 2017, 11:02:52 AM »
Does Pink Pistols have any recommendations for NRA board members who are particularly friendly to our cause?  If there are no official recommendations, might I suggest a couple of people, for those here who are voting members of the NRA?

HuckleberryFun

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Re: NRA 2017 voting ballot recommendations
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2017, 10:51:36 PM »
I tried researching the candidates to weed out the extremists and gay haters. Most of them have websites you can find if you google "candidate NRA board (name)". There is also a website called
nraontherecord.org that has a collection of controversial quotes by past and present NRA board members including anti gay slurs. Of course, new prospective board members will be a blank slate.
Many NRA board members are very conservative across the board, and some hate gays, but when they speak they speak for themselves and not the NRA as an institution. Basically, I voted for the sportsmen and women (aka the 'Fudds') who are more about shooting sports than a political agenda.
Hope this is some help.

chibajoe

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Re: NRA 2017 voting ballot recommendations
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2017, 11:33:02 AM »
Found this blog" http://www.loyaldissent.com/

Quote
The subject of perceived apathy also brings up another unresolved issue – many “old guard” Board members take their status so much for granted that they don’t even bother campaigning.  They are Board members now, they are nominated by a committee of their friends, they will be Board members again.  If the “new blood” grassroot candidates must earn their spot, so too should existing Directors.  We understand the need for industry inclusion and the draw of “known names,” but the ultimate question – as we have now asked for years – is this: What have you done for the organization and the Second Amendment rights of members since becoming a Board member?

A seat on the Board is an opportunity to work, not a reward for past – sometimes distant past – notoriety.  We cannot expect grassroots candidates to work even harder for election if our existing Board will not campaign, much less further the aims of our Association.  Demanding more of “the old guard” and having a nominating committee willing to ask hard questions of worth and effort would go a long way towards assuaging concerns about the fairness of the new policies.